Sea Salt with Chemical Additives?! Check for E535 Yellow Prussiate of Soda (YPS)

A food additive to AVOID: Yellow Prussiate of Soda

Just when you think you are eating a natural, whole and pure diet, think again. It’s crazy that we now have to even check the label of the salt we buy, but it’s a true sign of the times. Can food manufacturers save money but ‘cutting’ their food the same way drug dealers ‘cut’ their drugs with fillers? You bet! And can the fillers be dangerous, the same way they can be in drugs? Absolutely!

It’s an interesting story how I discovered the latest culprit in my food additive most ‘unwanted’ list.

E535 or Yellow Prussiate of Soda (YPS) as a Non-caking Agent in Salt…What is it??

A client of mine recently completed a 10-day green juice fast and colon detox cleanse under my care. He broke the fast by eating only fresh raw fruits for 2 days and he felt amazing. On the third day of eating, he ate only fruits in the morning and the went to a friend’s house and ate a plain baked potato with salt (no butter, no margarine, no herbs or seasonings). That night, he suffered terribly with hot flashes, restless sleep (insomnia), headaches, irritability and general unease. At no point during or after the detox did he feel this way so it was a real surprise to him and he contacted me first thing in the morning.

When we spoke, I was sure he had ‘snuck’ something else into his diet. He was adamant that he only had a baked potato and salt. Finally, I said, “Ok, let’s find about more about the salt.” He want back to the friend’s house and found a Morton Sea Salt with the following ingredients: Sea Salt, Yellow Prussiate of Soda.

It only took a fast bit of google research to realize that the Yellow Prussiate of Soda was what affected him.

Just an additive in salt? Yes! (What we should really be asking is Why does even plain salt need an additive now too??) Well, remember what I said about ‘cutting the drug’ with cheap fillers to make more money? Yep, it’s a sad, sick reality that the food industry is in the business of making money (NOT food).

First, I checked on Wikipedia to understand what the heck this stuff is. Here is what I found:

What is Sodium Ferrocyanide (Yellow Prussiate of Soda)?

Yellow Prussiate of Soda is Sodium ferrocyanide in its hydrous form (which means Sodium ferrocyanide with water). This is how Wikipedia describes Sodium ferrocyanide: “Sodium ferrocyanide is a chemical additive known as E 535 in the EU. It is added to road and food grade salt as an anticaking agent. When combined with iron, it converts to a deep blue pigment called Prussian blue. In photography, it is used for bleaching, toning, and fixing. It is used as a stabilizer for the coating on welding rods. In the petroleum industry, it is used for removal of mercaptans. Sodium ferrocyanide is produced industrially from hydrogen cyanide.

I don’t know about you, but to me, that definitely doesn’t sounds like something that is safe for human consumption!

So I decided to search a bit further and look for the MSDS for Sodium ferrocyanide. Every chemical made by man has what’s called a Material Data Safety Sheet (MSDS) which by law has to list what the chemical is and what type of harm can be experienced if ingested, if inhaled or in exposed to on the skin. On sciencelab.com, I found this:

Morton Salt MSDS

“Potential Acute Health Effects: Extremely hazardous in case of ingestion. Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of eye contact (irritant), of inhalation.” Scrolling down a bit, I read this: “Ingestion: Do not induce vomiting. Loosen tight clothing such as a collar, tie, belt or waistband. If the victim is not breathing, perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Seek immediate medical attention.

Just to be sure, I checked the Morton’s Sea Salt label again. I didn’t see anything about any warning of ingestion.

Instead, the label claims, “Morton has selected a sea salt perfect for all types of cooking and seasoning.”

Well, it seemed pretty clear to me that my client suffered a serious side effect from the additive in this sea salt. Since he had just fasted for 10 days on juice, his body was even cleaner than most and I’m sure that’s why his body reacted. But how many people are reacting to this additive every day and have no idea that the cause of their troubles was in their sea salt? And how many children are affected, their bodies being so much smaller than an adult and therefore having the potential of a more serious reaction? I mean, a chemical additive made from cyanide?!?!

I had to do something. So I went to the Morton website and filled out their contact form. This was my comment:

As a consumer, I am asking you to reconsider your choice of toxic ingredients in your salt. Have you looked at the MSDS for Yellow Prussiate of Soda? I would not even take a bath in your salt for fear that the toxins would enter my skin (would you take a bath in arsenic???) Seriously, there is simply no need to add a chemical to salt. Salt is salt. This country needs more natural whole and pure and less poison. My client was awake all night last night with hot flashes, restless sleep and a headache after having potatoes with nothing but potato and your Morton Fine Sea Salt. I am so sad to sea what so-called food companies are peddling as food.

I was so angry and I felt betrayed, because my client had trusted me, and I did not even think to warn him about eating salt!! It was an immediate reaction to the feeling that I want to protect people from this crap, and I didn’t expect a response. But, to my surprise, they responded immediately. They asked if I still had the sea salt and would I be willing to send it in for testing. A spark of hope entered my mind…maybe these food companies aren’t that bad, maybe they had a bad batch with too much of the Yellow Prussiate of Soda and maybe they are doing their best to resolve the issue. I really felt hopeful that somehow Morton was going to ‘fix’ this problem. I instantly replied, offering the sample and asking how it should be sent. They responded by asking for my address saying they would send a mail packet for me to return the sample to them at no cost. I was actually excited!

Days passed and I did not receive the mailer. 2 weeks passed. 3 weeks passed. I thought, hmmm..this is strange. So I emailed Morton again asking for an update on the mailer. And guess what?

They never replied. And they never sent a mailer. In short, they didn’t do anything.

Should I have been surprised? Not really. All of this only confirms and reaffirms what I have been saying all along: The food industry is in the business of making money (NOT food).

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) in table salt in Bali

Even with ‘normal’ salt, you have to check the label. Look at this container of table salt I found in Bali, Indonesia at many ‘so-called’ health food and even raw food restaurants…yes the second ingredient on the list is Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), and it’s right there in the label for the world to see. The third ingredient is a new way of listing Ribonucleotideas ‘Ribotide,’ another excito-toxin food additive and flavor enhancer that can give you the same reaction as MSG and an uncontrollably itchy rash to boot.

So if you got a screaming migraine headache after eating your hippie raw food salad next to the rice fields in Ubud, it was probably not from the spirits or the full moon.

Do you see Anticompactante YPS on this list of ingredients?

Here is yet another offending salt I saw when I was recently in Costa Rica. Do you see the ‘Anticompactante YPS‘ on this label? That sure sounds like Yellow Prussiate of Soda to me! Luckily I found this on my first morning in Costa Rica, and I avoided adding any salt to my salads for the remainder of my stay.

People think I am crazy for pointing this stuff out, but do you know how many people suffer from headaches, anxiety and insomnia and are on medications for it? What’s crazy to me is that I am the only one talking about this!!

For anyone who has done a detox, juice fast, colon cleanse, liver flush or raw food diet, please be aware that when your body is cleaner, you will most definitely be more sensitive to these types of chemical additives, and you may find yourself reacting to a food that previously you were able to eat with seemingly no problem.

Get into the habit of reading all of your food labels, including salt!

Ferrocianuro de sodio [E-535]: Yellow Prussiate of Soda

And again, another salt I found, this time in Colombia (and also Ecuador). In this salt there is added fluoride, which most expats in South America know is bad so many already don’t buy it. But, no one seems to be talking about the obvious offender.

Do you see ‘Ferrocianuro de sodio [E-535]‘ on this 130g. container of Refisal brand Sal? In Spanish, you may also see it listed as ‘amarillo prusiato de soda (YPS)’ on a label. Both of these are, yep you guessed it….Yellow Prussiate of Soda. E-535 is the universal food additive number for this chemical additive.

In some countries, the additive name – Yellow Prussiate of Soda – will be listed on the food label, and in other countries you will see the chemical additive number. As a number, Yellow Prussiate of Soda can be listed as E535, E-535 or 535. In the above example, they’ve listed both.

Yet another example is this so-called “heart healthy” salt sold in Israel. As you can see, it contains E535 right there on the label. (By the way, the “normal” unhealthy salt in Israel also contains Yellow Prussiate of Soda too!).

This “healthy” salt in Israel contains E535 or Yellow Prussiate of Soda!

Since I’ve been made aware of this additive, I have noted people’s reactions to it, anything from hot flashes, itchy rashes, red bumps on the skin, cracked skin rashes, irritability, increased heart rate, achy joints and insomnia to general malaise.

When removing the chemically-infected salt from their diet and replacing it with a Himalayan or pure sea salt with no additives, all symptoms disappeared, permanently.

Be sure to watch out for other derivatives of cyanide also used in salt: E536 Potassium ferrocyanide and E538 Calcium ferrocyanide. The most common one used is E535 Sodium ferrocyanide.

I personally use large/coarse Himalayan salt crystals in a grinder.

As Dr. Fred Bisci, a 80-year old 100% raw food vegan wisely says, “When in doubt, leave it out!”

More on Food Additives:

The following two tabs change content below.
Jennifer Thompson has been working with raw food, juices, smoothies and detox for over two decades to help people heal. Today, she shares her expertise worldwide, offering lectures, workshops, training and one-on-one consultations at various health and detox retreat centers. She provides Iridology Readings & Health Coaching via Skype and Phone to clients and continues to educate, motivate and inspire others on their journey of healing. When she’s not working, you’ll find her hiking in the mountains, power-walking along the sea or globe-trotting to a new and exotic health destination.
21 replies
  1. Elena
    Elena says:

    Dear Jennifer, thank you so much for this info about salt, thank you for your research, thank you for doing it for all of us. I will spread it to all my friends. You are wonderful! Thank you!!!

  2. celia bjork
    celia bjork says:

    I am from Sweden have lived in Colorado since the 50s though traveled all over. USA. I was having an open face sandwich with good cheese organic avacado and tomatoe with fresh ground pepper and my friend wanted one also. He then brought his morton sea salt to the table. As we are drinking our coffee I read the label yellow prussiate of soda and googled it. Did not like what I found out. That is how I found you. I am glad for all your imput. It is awful what is in or on our food. I am a very picky eater and find that even whole wheat bread has junk in it. Well Thank you for your information. I hope my friend stops using his sea salt for rinsing out his mouth. I would not ever eat mortons sea salt. I to will contact mortons and see if they respond to me. One other thing I had found when accidently I bought egglands best eggs. I read the label with the red die on top of eggs. So I called them to ask what kind of die it was they said the same thing as mercurichrome (not sure I spelled that right) anyway I got mad and said that’s not healthy he said well you don’t eat it I responded yes if you boil eggs it gets in the water. Anyway I won’t eat those eggs. Thank you again for your time. Sincerely celia

  3. Jason
    Jason says:

    I think you’re wrong about this.

    I also think you’re wrong about juice being safe and what it claims to be. I gave up juice when I read about flavor packets and discovered brands were adding sugar without putting it on the label.

    I am in the middle of a seven day fast, consuming only unsweetened coffee and tea and I ingested some sea salt with yellow prussiate of soda in it today and I felt fine like I did the other day.

    I do not think your client suffered problems from eating this additive. However, I would prefer to avoid all additives, if possible. When I am eating, I only eat organic food.

  4. Jennifer
    Jennifer says:

    Hi Jason, Thanks for your comment!

    The juice we ingest for a juice fast is always FRESH! Never used refined sugar or flavor packets for a juice fast, yuck!

    Yellow Prussiate of Soda is in fact dangerous. Would you ingest cyanide? We know that will kill us. Certainly a derivative of cyanide added to human foods should arouse some question and concern.

    I actually react to this additive as well now that I have had a chance to be exposed to it in Central and South America, and I can tell you that the effects are real. While true that not everyone will feel an immediate reaction, it is also true that most people are so toxic they don’t even know what makes them feel good or bad. The more we get these unnecessary additives OUT of our food, the better our health will be. Of that, I am sure!

    Be sure to check all food labels, because for sure, Yellow Prussiate of Soda is NOT organic!

  5. margaret
    margaret says:

    The human body can handle low levels of cyanide; it’s found in apples, for cryin’ out loud. Your client’s reaction sounds like my symptoms when my blood sugar gets too high. A potato is a hefty dose of carbohydrate, so maybe your client needs a glucose tolerance test. Diabetes is no fun.

  6. Jennifer
    Jennifer says:

    Hi Margaret, I will admit that it can be difficult to accept the idea that dangerous chemical additives are used in foods, but it is a sad and very real situation happening in our food supply today. Currently, there are over 4,000 additives used in foods and the regulations are outdated and not enforced. Since I wrote this article, I’ve hard from hundreds of people who have also reacted to this additive in salt, and I have noticed my own reaction to it when eating simple, organic raw lettuce, zucchini and cucumber with a salt containing 535. I personally do not eat potatoes and I minimize fruits in my diet; as a scientist, I also like to test everything on myself. I can tell you that I have reacted with hot flashes and trouble sleeping. Those are not atypical reactions to glucose intolerance. A pure salt with no additives is different that a tainted salt cut with chemicals. Why would you even resist that idea? Logically speaking, it is quite obvious that a pure food would be better. On that note, the natural cyanide in fruits is in the seeds and they are not recommended to eat in large doses (for example, eating too many apricot seeds can actually be very toxic for that very reason). Powdered concentrates used in salt are neither natural or whole foods. That is where the danger lies!

  7. Rich
    Rich says:

    I’m not sure why you keep harping on the partial word, “cyanide” in the chemical name for Yellow Prussiate of Soda. Perhaps just to elicit panic on the part of an unknowing or uninformed consumer Many chemicals are dangerous in bits and pieces, but when combined an bound in other chemical compounds become perfectly safe. Also, implying that E535 is a “cutting” agent that is cheaper just isn’t true. Salt by itself, particularly in a humid environment can stick together and clump up, making it difficult to use. E535, when added, prevents that from happening.

    If you want to flash “toxic” chemical names around how about SALT! Sodium Chloride. The element sodium by itself is toxic, and so is the chloride (would you like to go sip on a nice cup of chlorine) yet bound together they make, if not over done, a perfectly safe and tasty ingredient in many food items.

    I agree that it is a good idea to avoid additives and keep things pure, but I also think it is irresponsible to label something as bad that isn’t. Yes,the MSDS says not consume E535, but that is referring to a 100% concentration, not the amount used in salt as an anti-caking agent.

  8. Ron
    Ron says:

    Have your read Morton salts moto…”when it rains it pours”. I will assume you are to youg to have lived without airconditioning. Having salt that would actually come out of your salt shaker in humid weather was a blessing. And not all of us then or now can afford fancy imported salt or a salt grinder.

  9. Jennifer
    Jennifer says:

    Hi Ron,

    It’s always interesting to read people’s comments and reactions. Thank you for your insight! Actually I lived in Thailand for 6 years without air conditioning (and 2 years without a refrigerator and 4 years without hot water), so always be careful before making assumptions! One pound of “clean” salt might cost me $6 and the grinder costs about the same and it’s reusable for years; that one bag of $6 salt will last me 2-3 months. I think you are splitting hairs to say that it’s unaffordable. Of course, you can do what you want! As long as you are making an informed choice, I’m happy and I feel that I’ve done my job. Thanks again!

    Jennifer

  10. Jennifer
    Jennifer says:

    Hi Rich,

    The MSDS for Sodium Chloride (i.e. table salt) lists it as a safe and stable chemical. There are no toxic indications. The only warning is that it may cause skin or eye irritation (which is obvious because it’s salt)!

    There is nothing on the MSDS of Sodium ferrocyanide that says it is perfectly safe. If something says “extremely hazardous if ingested,” how can you NOT consider it to be toxic? With all due respect, I stand behind the truth in my article.

    Thank you!

  11. Carla
    Carla says:

    I am just thoroughly disgusted that I have to read the label on a box of salt! I am an avid label reader but sad to say, this had never occurred to me. Apparently, nothing is sacred. Thank you for the information.

  12. Jen
    Jen says:

    For the last 2 weeks I have been daily breaking out in an itchy rash on my chest and my husband has been getting headaches. It always seemed to happen after eating but we could not find a common food culprit… until I happened to glance at the back of the Morton’s sea salt we purchased exactly 2 weeks ago. HOW INFURIATING, especially to me as a pregnant woman who always reads food labels carefully, that the food industry could so catch me off guard with something like sea salt. My husband and I will never NOT read a food label again. THANK YOU for your exposé!!

  13. Megan
    Megan says:

    For a long time I had not eaten ANY food from my brother’s house, because that family is basically the unhealthiest family I’ve ever seen (among intelligent people). ie, the mother used to shoot cool-whip into her kids’ mouths for “fun”, and they had every kind of “sandwich” cookie known to man at their constant disposal.

    Anyway, my brother has been having problems iwith his heart lately and that concerned me, but it didn’t really put it into perspective as much as when my sister brought some BBQ chicken home and told me that it was ust chicken and nothing else. And since living in Eastern Europe (where chicken seems to still be edible) I’d been eating small amounts of chicken.

    That night I was certain that I was dying. i had such a headache (which I can count on one finger in my life), and my heart was beating like it was going to explode, I developed a fever and was so faint I couldn’t get to my feet. Obviously my body was detoxing something.

    Of course…to all of the “proof” seekers out there (who are no doubt just drones for the “greater dereliction” of our species…I have no proof that it was from either the meat, or the charcoal, or the fact that the chicken was no doubt riddled with something. I really don’t know. But it was something. Because that had NEVER happened to me previously and never since.

    I can now completely understand why my brother has turned into an old, fat man so quickly. And yes, I love him, but I can’t even get him to change one iota of his diet, because his wife (who has already had a double hysterectomy – if that’s the one for removing boobs) had cancer. No doubt from shameless consumption of that which isn’t food.

  14. Megan
    Megan says:

    Here’s something that I do at the store.

    First, I read everything. Every label. Every Single time I buy a product.

    They change ingredients all the time. Keep an eye on it.

    When I find items that have dangerous additives….aren’t food, I make the undesirable for purchase. Hopefully, raising the price of that item in the future, so as to make healthy items more desirable.

  15. Emily
    Emily says:

    For the past 4 months I’ve been broke out with an itchy rash on my chest and hips. I just found your post, read it, then went scouring through my cabinets… My “McCormick Fine Grind Mediterranean Sea Salt” has the YPS stuff in it and I also found that my Morton Iodized Salt has Dextrose in it! Why on earth would salt need sugar/glucose in it?! Lets see if replacing those two salts will help. =) Now I will ALWAYS check the labels!

    Thank you for your post!

  16. katie
    katie says:

    I had to up my sodium intake due to a deficiency. I’m a hardcore label reader, organic, preservative free person. This exact same salt got me!!! Bad bad people at morton!

  17. Robert
    Robert says:

    I just noticed this on the label of a salt packet from a restaurant. As a biochemist, this is very worrisome to me. It isn’t an extremely toxic additive (you can have up to around 40mg/kg before you see any side effects) but it certainly isn’t good for you! It evolves hydrogen-cyanide gas in the acidic environment of your stomach; that’s the same gas used to kill people in the Holocaust. I am deeply troubled by the direction the world is headed.

  18. Ryan
    Ryan says:

    At band camp, we were eating lunch. In the individually wrapped plastic wear, there was little packs of salt and pepper. I lazily read over them and saw “contains black pepper” then “contains salt, yellow prussiate of potash”. I was thinking, what IS that, so I asked around. Of course no one knew, so I looked it up and found this. I agree with you, humans are slowly poisoning ourselves, and we as a whole are being idiots for letting psychopaths do this. We need to stand up.

  19. Kari
    Kari says:

    I recently bought Windsor Sea Salt thinking Windsor was a well respected brand. The product was made is Spain. I read the label at home and was troubled by the inclusion of the word cyanide in sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate. So I went on line to find out more about the additive listed as an anti-caking agent. I found an article published by the EU down playing the effect of sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate but when I found this article and a few others, I immediately threw out the salt. I can’t believe companies use something containing cyanide and get away with calling it something so insignificant sounding as anti-caking agent or yellow prussiate of soda.

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion? Please be respectful of other participants in the conversation and keep your comments respectful, friendly and relevant. Differences of opinion are welcome, but trolling and abuse of other commentators and the Healthy Bliss team is not and will result in blacklisting. Thank you for keeping this a bully-free zone!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>